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Surf Tips

6 WITHDRAWAL TECHNIQUES TO CONSIDER WHEN SURFING TUBES

Bede abandons ship. Photo: Childs

When surfing tubes, just like in other fun activities, entry is easier than exit. Pulling in is easier than pulling out, and pulling out at the wrong time can have consequences. So, you’re goin on surfari, you’re gonna get tubed, you’re determined, you’re ready, GoPro is primed. But herein lies the snag: Reefbreak sections, just like beachbreak sections, section. And when they do, you need an out.

1. Pull through the back (forehand).

Faced with the shut down, the surfer pumps and digs inside rail into the bottom of the face, hoping to pop straight through the back (perhaps vigorously swimming) and avoid the dreaded over the falls. Works great when done right, yet a bit like delaying and worsening the inevitable, when done wrong.

2. Fall back off the tail.

Tricky to execute for mainly mental reasons. The theory is that, rather than leap forwards where the momentum is taking you (shortly followed by your sharp-ass surfboard, pinged the direction of your bum) you let yourself gently lean back onto the foamball (a bit like those team bonding trust exercises). Here, the anger of the wave has already expressed itself, thus you receive less pounding. A bit like communism, the theory is great, but…

3. Leap forwards over the nose.

Your most common exit for intermediate tunnelers. You’re racing, you’re in a hurry, you want out… so you dive for the exit. The problem is the urethane bungee that fires your fins and nose at you, plus the shallow trajectory of your dive inhibits penetration, and thus making a trip over the dreaded falls more likely.

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